healthcare professionals

Following on the footsteps of our American colleagues , MedTech Europe would like to offer some thoughts on the issue of transparency and disclosure laws and how certain adaptations could help to frame transparency for a new reality. Over the last few years, a number of European countries have passed transparency or disclosure (sometimes also called “Sunshine”) laws which require life science industry to track and publicly report certain payments and transfers of value made to Healthcare Professionals (HCPs) and Healthcare Organisations (HCOs) such as hospitals or medical societies. The objective of such laws is to provide patients with enhanced transparency into the relationships healthcare providers have with life science manufacturers, including medical technology companies (1) . The new MedTech Europe Code of Ethical Business Practice upholds the same objective while addressing the fragmentation created by the different national rules. More importantly, the Code goes a step further. Let us explain: the Code which entered into force this January introduces several important changes to the way the medical technology industry interacts with HCPs. One key aspect is the prohibition for our member companies to directly support HCPs to attend Third Party Organised Educational Conferences (e.g. paying for the registration fee, travel and lodging). Furthermore, the Code introduces transparency requirements for Educational Grants. They key objective is for companies to stop selecting the HCPs who receive financial support to attend such conferences. This change means that, from 1 January 2018, HCPs’ independent medical education can only be supported via Educational Grants, They will be provided to an independent third-party, such as a hospital or a scientific society, instead of taking the form of direct and unilateral transfers of value to an individual HCP (such as registration fee, travel and lodging costs). Moreover, companies will no longer be involved in the selection...
Sensors, artificial intelligence and big data are not only changing healthcare, they are transforming the workplace and may even reinvent the insurance sector. Stress takes its toll on all of us. It affects our mental health and is linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and obesity. It also costs employers tens of thousands of euro per year while the healthcare costs for governments and private insurers run into the billions. My start-up company, BioBeats, began with a mission to reduce people’s stress. We use biometric sensor technologies to understand stress and offer proven interventions that can reduce its impact. Wearables and smartphones can collect a wealth of data which are fed into artificial intelligence algorithms to anticipate moments of stress and deliver targeting interventions. By collecting biometric data for a couple of weeks, we can predict how you’ll sleep tonight or how you will perform at work next week. Opportunities in occupational health At first, we developed this product for the general public. The app, Hear and Now , is in the app store and teaches powerful deep-breathing exercises. These interventions are based on evidence-based techniques backed up by robust science. It soon became clear to us that the market for a tool like this is much bigger than stressed-out individuals keen on avoiding burnout. Employers have much to gain by understanding and reducing the burden of stress. Not only do companies want to curb avoidable absenteeism, they face a daily battle with presenteeism – people who turn up for work but are unproductive due to stress and worry. So, we built a dashboard for employers. The system collects information on employees which individuals can use to better understand when stress occurs and what causes it. They can then learn valuable stress-control techniques that improve their health. But for...
The new MedTech Europe Code of Ethical Business Practice (the “Code”) came in force on the 1 st January 2017 and replaces the Eucomed Code of Ethical Business Practices and the EDMA Code of Ethics. The Code allows for an additional year to phase out direct sponsorship by the entire medtech industry but this may be a good time to take stock of the situation; inquire if there are still grey areas and what are the opportunities going forward, therefore this letter. Over the last 2-3 years we tried through different means, such as the creation of an advisory group; bilateral discussions, panel discussions, etc to ensure that our partners, i.e. Healthcare Professionals (HCPs), Hospitals, Scientific Societies and Professional Congress Organisers (PCOs) are aware of the Code developments, but in order to get everyone on the same page, we thought to provide a short summary of what lies ahead for 2017: -- 1st January 2017 – the Code came into force The Code became binding for MedTech Europe Corporate Members . For Healthcare Organisations (HCOs) and Professional Congress Organisers that means that these companies have started to apply stricter rules when providing Educational Grants. -- Throughout 2017 - Outreach to European HCPs, medical societies and PCOs will continue The double objective of this outreach is for MedTech Europe to clarify any grey areas that you may still have on the new MTE Code and to ensure that going forward, the collaboration between the healthcare community and industry continues to the best interest of the patient. One event, where discussions, formal and informal, within the Healthcare Community will take place is the Global MedTech Compliance Conference (GMTCC) on 3-4 th May in Amsterdam. Please consider this as an official invitation to attend! -- Spring 2017 – Ethical MedTech Website Presently, the...
Shouldn’t we be rewarded for healthy behaviour rather than repeatedly punished for being ‘bad’? Fat tax and sugar tax, duty on cigarettes and vodka – everyone can think of a ‘sin tax’ they pay from time to time. These are the penalties we pay for making unhealthy choices. The idea of sin taxes has been gaining ground in recent years. The success of price rises on cigarettes and alcohol in curbing consumption is leading governments to consider what other disease-causing products could be taxed out of existence . In Europe, Denmark were the early movers: they introduced a tax on fatty foods in 2011. It applied to meat, dairy products, oils and certain other foods which contained more than 2.3% of saturated fat. The tax ‘worked’ in that it raised revenue and cut consumption of fatty foods by 4% . However, the policy didn’t last long. It was scrapped within 18 months because the government said the tax was too difficult and expensive to collect. Japan is taking a different route . Instead of hitting shoppers in the pocket to reduce the size of their gut, authorities impose fines on employers and local governments who fail to keep waistlines in check. Other countries, including the UK and Ireland have targeted sugary drinks by proposing a ‘soda tax’ to nudge consumers into making healthier choices. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver – a campaigner for healthy eating – hailed the move as a victory for children’s health. He was so happy about the new tax that he did a little dance at the end of a TV interview which was captured by BBC! There’s no doubt that taxes can be used to push people into making ‘better’ choices. But what ever happened to incentives for positive change? GPs in the UK get bonuses...
As ‘thinking season’ kicks off, the focus is on how technology and big data can deliver better value healthcare to more people than ever before. January is a time for reflection, planning and predicting what lies ahead. It’s the season for assessing the mega-trends that will shape our future and working out how we will respond. Perhaps the most prestigious venue for future-gazing is Davos where world leaders from politics and business gather on 17-20 January for the World Economic Forum . Here, global influencers will look at how prevailing economic, social and political forces present challenges and opportunities for all of us. Last year, the key phrase from Davos was the ‘ 4 th Industrial Revolution’ . The WEF set the tone for thousands of conversations on the topic last year, including at the MedTech Forum in Brussels last December. This year – with the convergence of technologies that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological systems still very much in view – the theme will be Responsive and Responsible Leadership . But what can healthcare leaders expect from 2017? When it comes to healthcare , the WEF frames the conversation with some key demographic statistics: - By 2050, the world’s population will have risen to 9.7 billion - 2 billion people will be over the age of 60 To continue to meet the (growing) demands of healthcare consumers without blowing up healthcare budgets, new ways of delivery services will be required. Smarter, more efficient, technologies and systems will be essential. This brings us to the concept at the heart of many new-year health policy forecasts: value . Value-based healthcare has been something of a buzzword since it was coined by Harvard’s Michael Porter . Most of us have an intuitive sense of value. In healthcare, Porter...
Authors: this article was written by Hans Martens, Martha Emneus , Anders Green and Camilla Sortso . This is the first blog of the series presenting the economic value of being in good health and the broader consideration of cost of disease. Europe’s health systems are struggling to maintain sustainability. One of the major challenges is the exponential increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and the number of patients in advanced and costly disease stages. A challenge, which is predicted to only increase in the years to come. Chronic diseases make high demands on health systems for continuous, quality care. For patients, chronic diseases are associated with shorter lifetime, reduced quality of life and economic as well as socio-economic burdens on the patients, their caregivers - formal or informal. For society, the burden is excess healthcare, pharmaceuticals, nursing, reduced labour market participation and ability to be socially and economically active and premature mortality. Altogether these costs underpin the major challenge of chronic diseases for our societies – not least in Europe where health is a collective rather than an individualised responsibility. This challenge must be dealt with by the health systems and perhaps by reconsidering where investments should be made in the future as with many of the chronical diseases onset and progression can be prevented if diagnosed early and precisely and if the process is well managed. Among chronic diseases, diabetes mellitus is one of the most burdensome with app. 371 million people diagnosed globally and evidence of rapidly increasing prevalence. In a recent study from Denmark it was estimated that costs of diabetes amounted to 14,349 Euro per person year. Of these, health care costs accounted 17% and pharmaceuticals 4%, while for example loss of productivity amounted to 42%. And this is not the whole story, because...