diagnostics

The 2017 Arab Health Exhibition & Congress and MEDLAB 2017 in Dubai were a celebration of healthcare innovation, with 4,400 of the world's leading healthcare companies from 70 countries attending the events. We, at Siemens Healthineers , were excited to showcase our pioneering spirit and engineering expertise, as well as the many diagnostic solutions we deliver across the globe to help healthcare professionals adapt to the changing healthcare environment. The MEDLAB exhibition featured products from laboratory, point-of-care and molecular diagnostics portfolios. We were especially honored to have our new solutions on display in a private viewing area in the UAE Ministry of Health and Prevention’s exhibition space during the 2017 Arab Health Exhibition & Congress. We were pleased to present part of our new portfolio at these two major industry events. We were happy to see that in the context of growing importance of digitalization and automation across the healthcare industry, the high interest among UAE dignitaries and heads of state was not scarce. Photo Credits: Arab Health Facebook Page [i] Under FDA review. Not CE-marked. Not available for sale. Any features listed are part of the development design goals. Future availability cannot be guaranteed. [ii] Dependent upon test mix. [iii] Versus leading IVD market competitors.
Authors: this article was written by Hans Martens, Martha Emneus , Anders Green and Camilla Sortso . This is the first blog of the series presenting the economic value of being in good health and the broader consideration of cost of disease. Europe’s health systems are struggling to maintain sustainability. One of the major challenges is the exponential increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and the number of patients in advanced and costly disease stages. A challenge, which is predicted to only increase in the years to come. Chronic diseases make high demands on health systems for continuous, quality care. For patients, chronic diseases are associated with shorter lifetime, reduced quality of life and economic as well as socio-economic burdens on the patients, their caregivers - formal or informal. For society, the burden is excess healthcare, pharmaceuticals, nursing, reduced labour market participation and ability to be socially and economically active and premature mortality. Altogether these costs underpin the major challenge of chronic diseases for our societies – not least in Europe where health is a collective rather than an individualised responsibility. This challenge must be dealt with by the health systems and perhaps by reconsidering where investments should be made in the future as with many of the chronical diseases onset and progression can be prevented if diagnosed early and precisely and if the process is well managed. Among chronic diseases, diabetes mellitus is one of the most burdensome with app. 371 million people diagnosed globally and evidence of rapidly increasing prevalence. In a recent study from Denmark it was estimated that costs of diabetes amounted to 14,349 Euro per person year. Of these, health care costs accounted 17% and pharmaceuticals 4%, while for example loss of productivity amounted to 42%. And this is not the whole story, because...
Never before has there been a more compelling time and a more urgent need to disrupt and transform the way we delivery healthcare to the people of our planet. I am the son of a wonderfully devoted Australian country GP who later became the country surgeon in the Hunter Valley in New South Wales. A father of 8, Dad was seemingly forever on-call and, with the exception of his faithful stethoscope, his scary scalpel and his trusty truck, he had absolutely zero technological assistance. No pager, no mobile phones, no EHR, no teleradiology. He was a truly old school practitioner and a mighty man, dedicated to his calling and adored by his patients. As a young lad, accompanying Dad in his old truck on long journeys late at night on those windy roads between each of the country hospitals (trying so hard to stay awake and keep my promise to Mum to make sure Dad did not fall asleep at the wheel), I knew there had to be a better, faster, safer, more effective and more efficient way of delivering healthcare. When my time came, and I followed proudly in Dad's brave footprints, I quietly committed to change the way the traditional hospital based and doctor dependent healthcare service was delivered. I got my chance years later when I set about exploring the possibility of building a simple tele-radiology system over the old 3K copper telephone system to link small isolated communities distributed over an enormous geographical area. This was not an idea borne without experience, as I had found myself performing obstetric ultrasound scans from the back of a truck in remote parts of Western Australia, in oppressive heat, shortly after completing my degree and qualifying as a radiologist. Working with pregnant mums to be in an aboriginal community,...
Consider this: about 60 million people in Europe have diabetes. Out of those who have it for more than 20 years, 75% will develop some form of diabetic retinopathy (DR). It’s a startling statistic. Early detection of DR can prevent blindness, which is why people with diabetes should be tested every year. But because so many people have diabetes – and the numbers are rising – screening everyone for this debilitating eye disease is a huge challenge. For one thing, we do not have enough ophthalmologists to check the millions of eyes at risk of DR. And even if we did, the cost would be significant. New approaches are urgently needed. Fortunately, there is a solution on the horizon. By combining sophisticated cameras with artificial intelligence (AI), we can make diabetic retinopathy screening more efficient and cheaper – helping to deal with the growing demand for this crucial service. ‘Deep learning’ is a powerful kind of AI that can detect specific features in an image of the eye with high sensitivity. It allows health professionals to diagnose the stages of retinopathy in milliseconds. At DreamUp Vision, we are using this technology as a SaaS platform, as well as integrating it into a fundus camera – the kind of camera that ophthalmologists use to scan the eye. The technology is so flexible that any healthcare professional could scan a patient’s eye and get an immediate answer if the patient has signs of the disease or not. This could go a long way to addressing the shortage of ophthalmologists, while bringing expert care to people who do not live near specialist health centres. Learn by doing The incredible thing about this kind of AI is that it learns : the more eye scans it sees, the more accurate it becomes. We are...
The second European Medtech Week from 13-17 June was a platform actively leveraged by all stakeholders to discuss the potential of MedTech. Over 100 events took place in 18 European countries as part of MedTech Week, with the medtech industry and our various partners discussing topics that were high on their national agendas. National medtech associations and individual companies demonstrated how medical technologies save and transform peoples’ lives. It was great to see healthcare professionals and patients from very different backgrounds and regions across Europe sharing their first-hand, insightful experiences, as well as their views on what needs to change in order to improve their daily lives. One of the topics that was discussed in a number of countries was the role and potential of eHealth. This is a subject very close to my heart because I believe it will be a key enabler for moving healthcare in the right direction. Based on the feedback from a range of events across Europe, we can see there seems to be strong agreement amongst all stakeholders that three important issues need to be addressed in order to use the full potential of eHealth: - We need a safe regulatory environment for e-products and services - We need to adapt funding schemes appropriately to allow access to e-products and e-services - We must move forward in terms of interoperability of products, services and systems Clear and timely action on these areas would allow eHealth to facilitate solutions to a range of healthcare challenges: using big data, embracing health apps, and deploying remote solutions in the most efficient way for the benefit of patients and doctors. I believe this year’s European Medtech Week showed that our industry has grown up and is now a reliable and relevant partner seeking to be a responsible participant...
The medical technology industry creates over half a million different products, from pacemakers and artificial hips to condoms and pregnancy tests. Despite the impact these products have on millions of people of all ages every day, medtech is still a little known and often misunderstood sector. With European MedTech Week now in its second year, we want to change this. From 13-17 June, the MedTech sector is hosting activities across the continent to raise awareness of the industry and the life-changing innovation we invest in and provide. MedTech Week is a chance for the entire healthcare community to discuss the future of Europe’s health and how medical technology can address current challenges and ensure more sustainable pathways of care. There is a lot that we can do. The medtech sector is at the cutting edge of research and development. It employs some of the world’s most skilled doctors, engineers, and scientists. From prevention to diagnosis, treatment and cure medtech innovations are absolutely crucial to public health and patient wellbeing. For my part, I also see MedTech Week as an opportunity to reinforce our industry’s commitment to high ethical standards. Our sector works closely with healthcare professionals to develop new and innovative technologies that drive improvements in patient care. Commitment to a robust Code of Ethical Business Practice safeguards these important relationships. This is why MedTech Europe recently endorsed an updated ‘Code’ which applies both to device and diagnostic companies. The Code provides a clear framework for open and transparent interactions between industry and healthcare professionals, ensuring that patients can continue to benefit from these collaborations. The medtech industry partners with all types of professionals on a daily basis so I am delighted that this year, the dedicated website for European MedTech Week www.medtechweek.eu will feature their perspectives, along with those...