Dr. Gabriela Prada

Dr. Gabriela Prada is the Director of Health Innovation, Policy and Evaluation at The Conference Board of Canada. She has 20 years of experience as a physician, management consultant, policy researcher, and administrator. She has done extensive work on innovation policy and value-based procurement and has presented and facilitated dialogue in these topics in Canada, Barcelona, Moscow, Bratislava, Washington DC, and Lisbon. She leads the Council for Innovation Procurement in Health Care at the Conference Board of Canada and was recently appointed member of the Expert Panel on Supply Chain in Healthcare, which was tasked to make recommendations to Ontario’s Minister of Health to redesign healthcare supply chain in the province.  She is a mentor, has a master’s degree in health administration from the University of Ottawa, and is a Certified Health Executive.

This blog is part 5 of a series on the MEAT value-based procurement project, an initiative that advocates towards a shift from price-based procurement towards value-based procurement. It does so by defining a Most Economically Advantageous Tendering (MEAT) framework that includes the value of medical technologies, services and solutions in procurement processes across Europe. Read part 1 , part 2 , part 3 and part 4 . Despite heroic efforts to control healthcare costs, Canada is still among the countries with the highest healthcare expenditures. In 2013, Canada spent 10.2% of its GDP on healthcare, which was above the average for its peer OECD countries. Yet, the quality of healthcare services does not always match this level of investment. There are still great variations in healthcare quality across the country and, most importantly, Canada’s performance is weak on key indicators when compared with its peer countries. For example, as shown in the Conference Board of Canada’s latest How Canada Performs report card, Canada obtained “C”s for mortality due to cancer, mortality due to diabetes, mortality due to musculoskeletal diseases, and infant mortality. Canada’s health performance has dropped to 10th place from a much more enviable 5th place in the 1990s out of 17 peer countries. The need for improving outcomes while controlling costs is not unique to Canada. Many other countries are facing the same challenge and this has led to the emergence of ‘value-based’ agendas, which feature patient-centeredness, health services integration, and a shift from emphasis on volume of services provided to emphasis on improved patient outcomes. Value-based healthcare models are being adopted globally to maximize value for patients. Procurement is a key enabler of this transformation given that it is at the heart of purchasing value. Therefore, value-based procurement goes hand-in-hand with value-based healthcare. Value-based procurement is only...