Bertin Nahum

Engineering graduate, National Inst. Applied Sciences, Lyon. MSc in Robotic Science, Coventry Univ., UK. Founded Medtech in 2002 after 10 years in surgical robotics. His 1st robot, BRIGIT™, was for knee surgery. Launched the ROSA™ Brain neurosurgery robot in 2009. 4th in the Canadian review Discovery Series’ Top 10 Most Revolutionary Hi-tech Entrepreneurs and Legion of Honor in 2013. Named Dr. of Technology honoris causa by Coventry University, in 2014. ROSA™ Spine, devoted to minimally invasive spine surgery got the CE mark in 2014 and FDA clearance in 2016.

Revolutionising and reinventing Medicine We are currently experiencing a great period of particularly stimulating technological breakthroughs. A great deal of progress is expected in practically all areas of our daily life: health, home, work, consumption, the environment… In the health sector alone, there are plenty of new inventions: you can manage your diabetes with a mobile application, make a prosthesis with a 3D printer, continuously monitor your own statistics and there are new techniques for predictive analysis . These inventions are gradually transforming our approach to health and the relationship between hospitals and patients. As these innovative technologies become more and more widespread, the patient becomes more active in monitoring his own state of health and the hospital’s role is changing: we spend less time in hospital, there’s greater comfort for the patient, and the costs for our social security system are reduced. So, in the long run, medical innovation may improve both the quality of healthcare for the patient and the performance of our health system. At this time of medical innovation, surgical robotics is a particularly promising area. A sign of its potential: surgical robotics alone represents a world market which should reach over 20 billion dollars by 2020! This is mainly due to the boom in minimally invasive surgery, which is a way of operating patients via very small incisions. I created Medtech because I was convinced that this trend was inevitable and positive both for patients and the medical world. By democratising the access to minimally invasive surgery, this technology facilitates and considerably improves the surgical act - serving patients and practitioners - and contributes to the performance of hospital facilities. Let’s transmit and connect these innovations! As innovations are only meaningful when they are shared, surgical robotics also aims to make modern surgery accessible to...