I wonder, have you ever had a conversation with your doctor or nurse about barcodes? Not likely, I guess! Whilst the humble barcode is so ingrained in everyday life (after all, we all scan barcodes at the checkout), its potential in healthcare is both enormous, but unfortunately largely unknown. The reality is that for patients and caregivers, the beep of a scanned barcode has the possibility to help ensure that a patient receives the right...

MedTech Views is a platform for dialogue about medical technologies. Read more

I wonder, have you ever had a conversation with your doctor or nurse about barcodes? Not likely, I guess! Whilst the humble barcode is so ingrained in everyday life (after all, we all scan barcodes at the checkout), its potential in healthcare is both enormous, but unfortunately largely unknown. The reality is that for patients and caregivers, the beep of a scanned barcode has the possibility to help ensure that a patient receives the right medical product at the right time and that caregivers have the benefit of additional surety in their processes. Scanning barcodes can help to minimise errors due to incorrect identification of product or patient and ensure the correct product is in the hospital when the patient needs it. The global, voluntary user community, GS1 Healthcare - which brings together all healthcare supply chain stakeholders, including manufacturers, distributors, healthcare providers, solution providers, regulatory bodies and industry associations - recently produced a video to illustrate the value global standard barcodes add in hospital processes. For every one of us, this is a must-watch - after all, at one point in our lives, we will all be patients. For staff of healthcare product supplier organisations this is even more important. After all, suppliers are applying GS1 barcodes to meet a range of regulatory and trading partner requirements. In turn, these barcodes should be used by all healthcare stakeholders, most importantly, the healthcare provider organisations and staff that are issuing these suppliers’ products to patients. Please take two minutes of your time, open your minds and remember that the use of global standard barcodes in healthcare empowers all of us - patients, healthcare provider staff and healthcare provider organisations. A simple scan can contribute to doctors and nurses being able to focus even more on caring for every one of...
Most Europeans born today will live into their eighties but behind that impressive statistic lie inequalities and ill-health. It’s time we focused on adding life to years instead of years to life. In 1990, life expectancy at birth was 74.1 years in Europe. Today, it’s 80.9. This is a remarkable achievement, by any measure. However, adding to our quantity of life is no guarantee of quality of life. Yes, the chances of surviving cancer, heart attack and stroke are higher than ever, thanks to improved healthcare. The prospects of surviving without disability are less rosy. Startling statistic Here is one of the most shocking statistics I’ve read in a long time: men and women spend 79% and 74% of their lives, respectively, in good health. Or, to put it another way, men live more than a fifth of their lives in bad health while women live more than a quarter of their lives in an unhealthy state. This explains why policymakers are shifting focus to healthy life years . The EU is trying to add two healthy life years – or ‘disability-free life expectancy’ – to our lives by 2020. After all, adding two more years to life is not worth much if they are two extra years of misery. Today in Europe, 50 million people over the age of 65 live with two or more chronic conditions, according to figures published by the EU/OECD . This comes at a profound human cost as well as an estimated economic loss of €115 billion. Another challenge that lies behind the impressive life expectancy figures is inequality. Let’s take gender first: the typical European women lives to around 83 while her male counterpart is lucky if he celebrates his 78 th birthday. Even bigger disparities emerge if we compare Europe’s best-performing health...
The new MedTech Europe Code of Ethical Business Practice (the “Code”) came in force on the 1 st January 2017 and replaces the Eucomed Code of Ethical Business Practices and the EDMA Code of Ethics. The Code allows for an additional year to phase out direct sponsorship by the entire medtech industry but this may be a good time to take stock of the situation; inquire if there are still grey areas and what are the opportunities going forward, therefore this letter. Over the last 2-3 years we tried through different means, such as the creation of an advisory group; bilateral discussions, panel discussions, etc to ensure that our partners, i.e. Healthcare Professionals (HCPs), Hospitals, Scientific Societies and Professional Congress Organisers (PCOs) are aware of the Code developments, but in order to get everyone on the same page, we thought to provide a short summary of what lies ahead for 2017: -- 1st January 2017 – the Code came into force The Code became binding for MedTech Europe Corporate Members . For Healthcare Organisations (HCOs) and Professional Congress Organisers that means that these companies have started to apply stricter rules when providing Educational Grants. -- Throughout 2017 - Outreach to European HCPs, medical societies and PCOs will continue The double objective of this outreach is for MedTech Europe to clarify any grey areas that you may still have on the new MTE Code and to ensure that going forward, the collaboration between the healthcare community and industry continues to the best interest of the patient. One event, where discussions, formal and informal, within the Healthcare Community will take place is the Global MedTech Compliance Conference (GMTCC) on 3-4 th May in Amsterdam. Please consider this as an official invitation to attend! -- Spring 2017 – Ethical MedTech Website Presently, the...
Shouldn’t we be rewarded for healthy behaviour rather than repeatedly punished for being ‘bad’? Fat tax and sugar tax, duty on cigarettes and vodka – everyone can think of a ‘sin tax’ they pay from time to time. These are the penalties we pay for making unhealthy choices. The idea of sin taxes has been gaining ground in recent years. The success of price rises on cigarettes and alcohol in curbing consumption is leading governments to consider what other disease-causing products could be taxed out of existence . In Europe, Denmark were the early movers: they introduced a tax on fatty foods in 2011. It applied to meat, dairy products, oils and certain other foods which contained more than 2.3% of saturated fat. The tax ‘worked’ in that it raised revenue and cut consumption of fatty foods by 4% . However, the policy didn’t last long. It was scrapped within 18 months because the government said the tax was too difficult and expensive to collect. Japan is taking a different route . Instead of hitting shoppers in the pocket to reduce the size of their gut, authorities impose fines on employers and local governments who fail to keep waistlines in check. Other countries, including the UK and Ireland have targeted sugary drinks by proposing a ‘soda tax’ to nudge consumers into making healthier choices. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver – a campaigner for healthy eating – hailed the move as a victory for children’s health. He was so happy about the new tax that he did a little dance at the end of a TV interview which was captured by BBC! There’s no doubt that taxes can be used to push people into making ‘better’ choices. But what ever happened to incentives for positive change? GPs in the UK get bonuses...
As ‘thinking season’ kicks off, the focus is on how technology and big data can deliver better value healthcare to more people than ever before. January is a time for reflection, planning and predicting what lies ahead. It’s the season for assessing the mega-trends that will shape our future and working out how we will respond. Perhaps the most prestigious venue for future-gazing is Davos where world leaders from politics and business gather on 17-20 January for the World Economic Forum . Here, global influencers will look at how prevailing economic, social and political forces present challenges and opportunities for all of us. Last year, the key phrase from Davos was the ‘ 4 th Industrial Revolution’ . The WEF set the tone for thousands of conversations on the topic last year, including at the MedTech Forum in Brussels last December. This year – with the convergence of technologies that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological systems still very much in view – the theme will be Responsive and Responsible Leadership . But what can healthcare leaders expect from 2017? When it comes to healthcare , the WEF frames the conversation with some key demographic statistics: - By 2050, the world’s population will have risen to 9.7 billion - 2 billion people will be over the age of 60 To continue to meet the (growing) demands of healthcare consumers without blowing up healthcare budgets, new ways of delivery services will be required. Smarter, more efficient, technologies and systems will be essential. This brings us to the concept at the heart of many new-year health policy forecasts: value . Value-based healthcare has been something of a buzzword since it was coined by Harvard’s Michael Porter . Most of us have an intuitive sense of value. In healthcare, Porter...
We built the War on Cancer website to give patients and their families a storytelling platform. Now it’s time to add new features and bring the medtech industry and healthcare sector into the community In January 2015, I was living in London with my best friend Fabian Bolin . Fabian was preparing to move to LA to pursue his acting career when he began to feel ill. His leukaemia diagnosis came as a total shock and changed our lives forever. Fabian started blogging about his experience as a cancer patient and gained quite a following. I was helping with some of the administrative and practical issues he faced, and supporting him along his journey. One day, when his story began to make headlines and his inbox was full of encouraging messages of support from total strangers, we started to talk about how this could become something even bigger. That’s when we started War on Cancer . At first, we had a simple idea: we wanted to enable people to share their stories and to experience the love that had helped Fabian during a difficult time. But as the project evolved, we saw an opportunity to do more. The storytelling platform is the cornerstone of the community – it helps people through their recovery process and provides others with insights into the reality of undergoing cancer treatment. Our vision is for a more inclusive community where we invite patients and their loved ones, but also medtech companies and the healthcare industry – everyone who has a part to play in eradicating cancer. The potential is considerable. Not only do we want patients to interact with one another, we envision a community where companies, health professionals and others can also create a profile and engage. Through these channels, companies could create seminars,...