Authors: this article was written by Hans Martens, Martha Emneus , Anders Green and Camilla Sortso . This is the first blog of the series presenting the economic value of being in good health and the broader consideration of cost of disease. Europe’s health systems are struggling to maintain sustainability. One of the major challenges is the exponential increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and the number of patients in advanced and...

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Shouldn’t we be rewarded for healthy behaviour rather than repeatedly punished for being ‘bad’? Fat tax and sugar tax, duty on cigarettes and vodka – everyone can think of a ‘sin tax’ they pay from time to time. These are the penalties we pay for making unhealthy choices. The idea of sin taxes has been gaining ground in recent years. The success of price rises on cigarettes and alcohol in curbing consumption is leading governments to consider what other disease-causing products could be taxed out of existence . In Europe, Denmark were the early movers: they introduced a tax on fatty foods in 2011. It applied to meat, dairy products, oils and certain other foods which contained more than 2.3% of saturated fat. The tax ‘worked’ in that it raised revenue and cut consumption of fatty foods by 4% . However, the policy didn’t last long. It was scrapped within 18 months because the government said the tax was too difficult and expensive to collect. Japan is taking a different route . Instead of hitting shoppers in the pocket to reduce the size of their gut, authorities impose fines on employers and local governments who fail to keep waistlines in check. Other countries, including the UK and Ireland have targeted sugary drinks by proposing a ‘soda tax’ to nudge consumers into making healthier choices. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver – a campaigner for healthy eating – hailed the move as a victory for children’s health. He was so happy about the new tax that he did a little dance at the end of a TV interview which was captured by BBC! There’s no doubt that taxes can be used to push people into making ‘better’ choices. But what ever happened to incentives for positive change? GPs in the UK get bonuses...
As ‘thinking season’ kicks off, the focus is on how technology and big data can deliver better value healthcare to more people than ever before. January is a time for reflection, planning and predicting what lies ahead. It’s the season for assessing the mega-trends that will shape our future and working out how we will respond. Perhaps the most prestigious venue for future-gazing is Davos where world leaders from politics and business gather on 17-20 January for the World Economic Forum . Here, global influencers will look at how prevailing economic, social and political forces present challenges and opportunities for all of us. Last year, the key phrase from Davos was the ‘ 4 th Industrial Revolution’ . The WEF set the tone for thousands of conversations on the topic last year, including at the MedTech Forum in Brussels last December. This year – with the convergence of technologies that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological systems still very much in view – the theme will be Responsive and Responsible Leadership . But what can healthcare leaders expect from 2017? When it comes to healthcare , the WEF frames the conversation with some key demographic statistics: - By 2050, the world’s population will have risen to 9.7 billion - 2 billion people will be over the age of 60 To continue to meet the (growing) demands of healthcare consumers without blowing up healthcare budgets, new ways of delivery services will be required. Smarter, more efficient, technologies and systems will be essential. This brings us to the concept at the heart of many new-year health policy forecasts: value . Value-based healthcare has been something of a buzzword since it was coined by Harvard’s Michael Porter . Most of us have an intuitive sense of value. In healthcare, Porter...
We built the War on Cancer website to give patients and their families a storytelling platform. Now it’s time to add new features and bring the medtech industry and healthcare sector into the community In January 2015, I was living in London with my best friend Fabian Bolin . Fabian was preparing to move to LA to pursue his acting career when he began to feel ill. His leukaemia diagnosis came as a total shock and changed our lives forever. Fabian started blogging about his experience as a cancer patient and gained quite a following. I was helping with some of the administrative and practical issues he faced, and supporting him along his journey. One day, when his story began to make headlines and his inbox was full of encouraging messages of support from total strangers, we started to talk about how this could become something even bigger. That’s when we started War on Cancer . At first, we had a simple idea: we wanted to enable people to share their stories and to experience the love that had helped Fabian during a difficult time. But as the project evolved, we saw an opportunity to do more. The storytelling platform is the cornerstone of the community – it helps people through their recovery process and provides others with insights into the reality of undergoing cancer treatment. Our vision is for a more inclusive community where we invite patients and their loved ones, but also medtech companies and the healthcare industry – everyone who has a part to play in eradicating cancer. The potential is considerable. Not only do we want patients to interact with one another, we envision a community where companies, health professionals and others can also create a profile and engage. Through these channels, companies could create seminars,...
A 2015 report from The Lancet Global Surgery Commission found that nearly one-third of the global burden of disease can be treated surgically and that 5 billion people lack access to safe and affordable surgical care. At Johnson & Johnson, we are looking to improve the standard of care and treatment, accelerating our pace of innovation, training more physicians globally through our surgical institutes and our partnerships - such as with the AO Foundation - to help make a difference for patients. As a global leader in the field of surgery our products are literally stitched into almost every surgical procedure in every market around the world. As the Head of Research and Development for the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, I have the privilege of leading a team of more than 3,500 engineers, scientists and clinicians focused on developing and delivering safe and clinically meaningful innovative solutions that address unmet needs. It is through the lens of meaningful innovation and the benefits it brings for patients that we make important decisions about how we advance our portfolio. Recently, we’ve brought all of our Medical Devices R&D into a single organisation so that we can adapt our Medical Device innovation model to better meet the needs of a rapidly changing healthcare environment. We have launched an Innovation Agenda that is clear and actionable to everyone in our organisation. Our Agenda places a premium on innovation that we can deliver. It ensures our teams have the proper funding to support innovation and that we create a culture that rewards prudent risk taking. Most importantly, our Innovation Agenda challenges everyone in our organisation to participate in driving meaningful innovation. Specifically, we are shifting our focus from platforms to solutions so that we address medical needs across the full continuum of disease...
Authors: this article was written by Hans Martens, Martha Emneus , Anders Green and Camilla Sortso . This is the first blog of the series presenting the economic value of being in good health and the broader consideration of cost of disease. Europe’s health systems are struggling to maintain sustainability. One of the major challenges is the exponential increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and the number of patients in advanced and costly disease stages. A challenge, which is predicted to only increase in the years to come. Chronic diseases make high demands on health systems for continuous, quality care. For patients, chronic diseases are associated with shorter lifetime, reduced quality of life and economic as well as socio-economic burdens on the patients, their caregivers - formal or informal. For society, the burden is excess healthcare, pharmaceuticals, nursing, reduced labour market participation and ability to be socially and economically active and premature mortality. Altogether these costs underpin the major challenge of chronic diseases for our societies – not least in Europe where health is a collective rather than an individualised responsibility. This challenge must be dealt with by the health systems and perhaps by reconsidering where investments should be made in the future as with many of the chronical diseases onset and progression can be prevented if diagnosed early and precisely and if the process is well managed. Among chronic diseases, diabetes mellitus is one of the most burdensome with app. 371 million people diagnosed globally and evidence of rapidly increasing prevalence. In a recent study from Denmark it was estimated that costs of diabetes amounted to 14,349 Euro per person year. Of these, health care costs accounted 17% and pharmaceuticals 4%, while for example loss of productivity amounted to 42%. And this is not the whole story, because...
In the second of a two-part series, Dr. Johnny Walker talks about Jinga Life and the power of managing healthcare at home. Read the first part here . We have an ever growing clinical demand and an ever rising consumer expectation to deliver "best of breed" services across every step of the patient journey. We are living in a world where consumer-led market disruption is the norm in business, where technology that at one point was contained purely in the realm of Sci-Fi is now ubiquitous and commoditized. The current resources are strained and incapable of delivering services in this way and we are buckling under the daily fight for survival at the clinical coal face. The traditional healthcare system is simply unsustainable despite the phenomenal efforts of everyone within the ecosystem in putting their shoulder to the wheel. We need to rethink the healthcare structures. An important observation from my experience is that, in 92% of cases, the ever present custodian of well-being in a family is female. Whether this is accompanying the patient, or being the first person members of the family call when they are sick, the centre of well-being in many family units is the female, the protector, the shepherd, the warrior. The Jinga [1] . Jinga Life aims to engage, embrace, enable, empower, and educate the Jinga. By populating an Electronic Health Record, designed and maintained by the Jinga for the family, extending primary care models to include the home, and using simple technologies to increase the connectivity between the Jinga and the family’s care professionals, Jinga Life desires to place the Jinga at the centre of her healthcare team. Our vision is to change focus from the traditional hospital based doctor focused solution, and put the Jinga at the core of her and her...